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Equity for All - John Hickenlooper for U.S. SenateSkip to main content Enable accessibility for visually impaired Open the accessibility menu Skip to content CHIP IN $10 TO SUPPORT JOHN HICKENLOOPER >> CHIP IN $10 TO SUPPORT JOHN HICKENLOOPER >> Home Meet John Español Facebook-f Twitter Instagram Spotify Donate Now Donate Now The United States has a long history of racism, segregation, and legalized oppression based on skin color. The economic disadvantages associated with race are varied, and persist to [DATE REMOVED]. Any form of discrimination, either overt or covert, has no place in our state or country. We must ensure all people have access to quality education, a strong social safety net, family-sustaining jobs, and physical security. I am committed to working hand-in-hand with communities of color to design economically just reforms that make an impact on the legacy of inequality that has plagued our country for generations. For the entirety of my career in public life, I have been committed to increasing the size of the table so that everyone has a seat. When I was mayor of Denver, nearly 60% of my cabinet appointments were women, and more than half were people of color. My predecessor, Mayor Wellington Webb, connected our team with leading organizations that became invaluable partners in supporting our agenda of diversity and inclusion. As governor, I put special effort into making sure that every state board and commission more accurately reflected the diversity of Colorado’s population.  My Equity For All plan is a continuation of this work and a commitment to the people of Colorado. Every individual deserves to live in a country where biases against race do not determine their opportunity to succeed. Whether in health care, the economy, the legal system, the environment, or our democracy, greater equity is not optional — it is required. We have a moral imperative to do far better than we ever have before, and I am committed to being a fierce advocate in this fight. INCREASING HEALTH EQUITY Improve Access to Health Care: Health care is a right, not a privilege. As governor, I was proud to bring lawmakers together from both sides of the aisle to expand Medicaid for an additional 400,000 Coloradans. I also established our state exchange, Connect for Health Colorado, which allowed individuals to compare plans for quality and affordability. In the process, we cut the uninsured rate by nearly two-thirds.  We worked hard to reach everyone, but there is more work to be done. As of 2019, 361,000 Coloradans still lacked health insurance — a quarter of whom are eligible for coverage under Medicaid. And, as of 2015, the Latinx community in Colorado was uninsured at three times the rate of white Coloradans. The final steps to universal coverage are among the most difficult, and largely depend on the outcome of [DATE REMOVED]’s election. Senator Gardner and the Republican-led Senate have repeatedly voted to repeal the ACA and Medicaid expansion, and Gardner supports a lawsuit before the Supreme Court that could end protections for people with preexisting conditions — including 2.4 million Coloradans.  If elected, I am committed to working towards affordable, universal coverage by introducing a public option that can boost competition in the marketplace and lower prices. I will also fight to cut the cost of prescription drugs and ensure that our vital social safety net programs such as mental health and substance abuse recovery services, as well as CHIP, Medicare, and Medicaid, have Congress’s full funding and support. Address Systemic Racism: Health care outcomes diverge dramatically based on race. This reality is rooted in structural biases, systemic racism, and decades of underinvestment in communities of color. It is not enough to simply expand the scope of coverage, we must change the nature of how care is provided to ensure more equal treatment for all. No policy proposal will be a panacea — the factors that contribute to these health disparities are as varied as they are damaging — but dedicated resources will absolutely help. We must research diseases where divergent outcomes are pronounced — including diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and infant mortality — to better understand their roots. Congress should appropriate funds for programs addressing the social determinants of health, including nutritious food, public transportation, and safe spaces for physical activity. Medical schools must play their part by prioritizing diversity and inclusion when recruiting the next generation of practitioners, and curriculums should provide thorough training in identifying and correcting biases in care. Finally, important bills such as the Health Equity and Accountability Act, a collaborative effort to reduce inequalities in health care that has been reintroduced each Congress for [DATE REMOVED], should finally have the chance to become law. Close Gaps in COVID-19 Outcomes: The coronavirus is highlighting the glaring inequalities in our healthcare system. Black Coloradans make up nearly 4% of the state’s population yet account for 7.6% of coronavirus cases. Latinx Coloradans are 22% of the population and make up 35% of the state’s positive cases. This is unacceptable. Coloradans of color are particularly vulnerable to contracting COVID-19 because they are more likely to be essential workers in this pandemic, and it is vital that they have the protective equipment they need to do their jobs safely. Furthermore, study after study shows that Black and Latinx Americans are dying of coronavirus at significantly higher rates than white Americans. Adequate testing, robust contact tracing, and social distancing are essential components to address any outbreak, but to get to the source of these divergent outcomes, we also must address the structural inequities in our healthcare system. Rooting out biases can and should continue far beyond the search for a vaccine. Fight for Reproductive Rights: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) marked a dramatic advancement for reproductive rights in this country, with childbirth no longer classified as a “pre-existing condition” and significantly reducing or eliminating out-of-pocket expenses for birth control. Yet gaps in coverage and access persist in communities of color, particularly during pregnancy. The United States has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the industrialized world, and Black women die three to four times more often than white women when giving birth. Women of color deserve equal access to high-quality, patient-centered care, both of which I am committed to fighting for as senator. This means gathering data about maternal mortality, investing in culturally-sensitive perinatal care and doula training, extending Medicaid coverage for new mothers to [DATE REMOVED], and using innovative payment models to incentivize improved outcomes. As senator, I pledge to protect the right to choose, fully fund critical government programs for reproductive health such as Title X, and work to reduce racial disparities across the spectrum of reproductive care.  EXPANDING ECONOMIC EQUITY Strengthen the Safety Net for Workers: Persistent efforts to weaken the social safety net — too often led, unfortunately, by Republicans in Congress — have contributed to the chronically high levels of poverty in our nation. These trends have only worsened as workers grapple with low hourly wages, lack of health insurance, and few workforce protections. The economic gap across racial lines is a constant reminder of the work that must be done to address poverty and support equality nationwide. Unions have been critical partners in this regard, nearly doubling wealth for union members as compared to nonmembers — particularly members of color. Workers cannot get ahead without affordable childcare, paid family leave, and fair compensation, including raising the minimum wage to $15. For individuals of color with disabilities, the barriers to economic opportunity can be even steeper, and tailored career, education, and financial support is necessary to foster more equal outcomes. Outside of the workplace, investments in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are critical, to keep working families healthy and fed. Our nation’s public transportation system, which many workers rely on to reach their jobs, is in dire need of repair. Finally, we should use the opportunity zone framework to prioritize federal investment in marginalized communities that face maintenance, safety, and water challenges. We must collectively fight for a future where all people have access to economic opportunities. A strong safety net helps bring those opportunities closer. Invest in Education: Education is one of the best investments we can make in our kids. As a public school parent, I am keenly aware of the particular power that public schools have to equalize opportunity for all students. As mayor of Denver, I helped lead the successful effort to establish the Denver Preschool Program, which provides free early childhood education to Denver families. As senator, I will work to ensure every student can benefit from the foundation for future success that education provides.  This includes closing the achievement gap by expanding literacy opportunities, promoting STEM learning for students of color, funding Head Start and full-day kindergarten, supporting the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), recruiting and retaining teachers of color, and so much more. We must also end the “school-to-prison pipeline,” in which students – sometimes as young as three – are disciplined under “zero tolerance policies” and suspended or expelled. Our public education system needs adequate funding to provide the type of enriching academic environment that is so vital to eliminate this practice. College affordability is another major hurdle for students. Expanded loan repayment and forgiveness programs, tuition-free community college, and investment in minority-serving scholarship programs such as TRIO and Gear Up are a big step in the right direction. For students who go to college but are unable to complete their degree, we must collect quality data on racial disparities in graduation rates as well as policy interventions that work best to address these gaps. Minority-Serving Institutions, such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Asian American & Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions, do important work to address discrimination in education, and I am committed to making sure they have the funding they need to continue their vital missions.  Boost Skills Training: Apprenticeships are a great tool for equalizing access to employment for all Americans. Currently, only 37% of young people in the United States complete a four-year degree. Apprenticeships offer an attractive bridge — or alternative — to postsecondary education. As governor, I helped establish CareerWise in Colorado, a job training program that works to provide students with valuable work experience, a paycheck in the tens of thousands, and free college credit—all while still in high school. As senator, I will fight to close employment gaps for communities of color by providing diverse cohorts of students the on-the-job skills training they need to succeed in the economy of the future.  Support Entrepreneurs of Color: Minority-owned small businesses are engines of employment and powerful agents of economic growth in their communities. Yet access to capital, which is a big challenge for any small business owner, is particularly difficult for entrepreneurs of color. Minority entrepreneurs are less likely to be approved for business loans or to receive investment than firms owned by white Americans. Community development financial institutions (CDFIs) step in to fill these gaps, and should receive full financial support from Congress. The economic crisis due to the COVID-19 pandemic has made funding particularly challenging to access these days, and by and large, relief efforts have not been designed with minority-owned small businesses in mind. I proposed a COVID-19 recovery plan that would set aside funding, including for businesses with 20 or fewer employees, which represent 88% of all small businesses, and give priority to minority- and women-owned businesses in particular. We must do all we can to make sure that minority entrepreneurs have the support they need to weather this crisis. Address Housing Inequality: Affordable housing is a fundamental necessity. Yet decades of segregationist and racist housing policies have left communities of color more housing insecure than their white peers. Expansion of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit and compliance with the 1968 Fair Housing Act are critical steps towards reducing this disparity. If elected senator, I will also push for the inclusion of affordable housing in any major infrastructure package we consider, and hold lenders accountable for predatory housing loans.  SECURING LEGAL EQUITY Overhaul the Immigration System: Our immigration system is a mess. Children have been held in cages at the southern border, the future of DACA recipients hangs in the balance, and President Trump is using the coronavirus as an excuse to turn away anyone seeking to immigrate. Many of these stories are wrenching. The last time Congress came close to passing comprehensive immigration reform was 2013, when then-Representative Gardner opposed the bill and helped block its passage in the House of Representatives. Our country cannot afford to wait any longer for the Republican-led Senate to find its conscience. Change needs to come now. Change needs to come for the one million pending immigration cases languishing in our underfunded courts system. Change needs to come for the businesses and farmers who depend on consistency yet receive none from our current visa program. And change needs to come for the nearly 11 million undocumented immigrants and 700,000 Dreamers whose lives are being upended by this administration. These individuals are enmeshed in our communities, they have families and pay taxes, and they deserve a pathway to citizenship. If we can invite this change by passing comprehensive immigration reform, we can do justice to our legacy as a nation of immigrants. Addressing Police Brutality: Videos of Black and Brown Americans being shot and brutalized should awaken outrage in every individual. I stand in solidarity with those who seek justice. In communities of color, playing in the park, asking for roadside assistance, relaxing at home, or even reporting on live television—raises the specter of discrimination and violence at the hands of police in a way it never does for other Americans. As mayor of Denver, police reform was one of our central priorities. [DATE REMOVED] Ferguson, we initiated efforts to reduce lethal force in policing, requiring all officers to go through crisis de-escalation training. For the first time in the history of the Denver Police Department, we hired a minority recruiter and established the Office of Independent Monitor to investigate allegations of police misconduct. We created the Civilian Oversight Commission to give communities direct input on how their own neighborhoods are policed, and we made it easier to discipline officers who use excessive force. What we did wasn’t perfect and there is so much more work to be done, locally and nationally, but we listened to communities of color. We tried to gain a greater understanding of the challenges they face, and we worked together towards a common goal. All of this needs to be done on a much larger scale today as the use of deadly force against Black and Brown Americans by police continues to be an epidemic in our country. There are tangible steps Congress can and must take to stop the violence, including requiring body cameras for all police officers, swiftly disciplining  officers who use excessive force, increasing transparency in policing data, and funding programs to heal the trauma of communities living in fear. As senator, I am committed to working with communities of color to address the fear and mistrust of law enforcement, to fiercely advocate for proper police training, and to increase accountability and oversight. People have a right to be safe, unafraid, and secure in their communities. And people have a right to not be victimized in their day-to-day lives or when they peacefully protest injustice. As a country, we have tolerated systemic racism and a broken criminal justice system for far too long. Now more than ever, we must listen to one another and ask ourselves what we can do to be a part of the solution. I pledge to do my part. Restructuring our Criminal Justice System: Our country incarcerates 22% of the world’s prisoners—the highest rate in the world, and disproportionately incarcerates people of color. 23% of all inmates in the state or federal prison system are Latinx, and 33% are African American. For too many, the criminal justice system is anything but just. As senator, I will work to address these disparities by supporting legislation such as Bobby Scott’s SAFE Justice Act, which offers an evidence-based prevention approach alongside tangible proposals to reduce recidivism and increase sentencing alternatives, including restorative justice. In addition, physical and verbal harassment against people of color, particularly LGBTQ individuals and, more recently, members of the AAPI community, are a form of overt discrimination that should never be tolerated. We must partner with police departments to close gaps that prevent the reporting and enforcement of existing bias crime laws, such as strengthening the tracking and reporting of hate crimes. Restructuring at all levels will be essential to ensuring that both public safety and social equality are protected. Decriminalize Marijuana: The movement for legalization gained steam across the country after Coloradans took decisive action to legalize marijuana in 2012. The implications for the justice system are massive. We know that African American men have been disproportionately imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana crimes. That’s one of the many reasons why I believe we must decriminalize marijuana at the federal level, with the flexibility for states to determine whether or not to legalize it. We should not be putting people in jail for nonviolent marijuana crimes, and we should evaluate sentences for those who were incarcerated prior to legalization. And in states like Colorado where marijuana is legal, we should work to level the playing field with regards to access to capital for entrepreneurs of color in the cannabis industry. All aspiring business owners should be able to take advantage of the economic opportunity this burgeoning industry presents, should they choose to do so. Promote Gun Safety: Over the past decade, more than 1.2 million Americans have been shot and millions more traumatized by gun violence. It is a national crisis, and one that disproportionately impacts communities of color. Latinx Americans are nearly twice as likely to die from gun violence as white Americans, while Black Americans are ten times as likely. We can and must take action by implementing universal background checks, passing red flag laws, banning assault weapons, and funding gun violence prevention research. Federal action on this front is astonishingly overdue and will make all communities safer. GROWING ENVIRONMENTAL EQUITY Support Environmental Justice: Climate change and environmental pollution affect all Americans, but they impact people of color and indigenous communities in an outsized way. According to the NAACP, “race – even more than class – is the number one indicator for the placement of toxic facilities in this country.” Air and water pollution cause higher rates of associated illnesses. The need to ensure that communities can rely on a clean water supply was devastatingly apparent in the failure of government in Flint, Michigan and is playing out again amidst the novel coronavirus pandemic. Fighting for a cleaner planet is irrevocably intertwined with racial justice. As senator, I will approach any climate or environmental policy from the perspective of civil rights and look forward to working with communities of color to design more inclusive, equitable solutions. Expand Access to Public Lands: Colorado is defined by our wild places. In the Senate, I’ll fight to make sure that federal agencies are working with local agencies and the outdoor sports and recreation industry to invest in innovative projects that increase access to and equity in the outdoors. In addition, I will support initiatives to promote hiring a diverse workforce within the National Park Service and associated agencies. By breaking down the barriers that prevent entry to the outdoors for communities of color, we can all share the amazing benefits of time spent exploring the landscapes that make our state unique. PROTECTING DEMOCRATIC EQUITY Reduce Barriers to the Political Process: Voting is the backbone of our democracy. When I was governor, I worked with the legislature to make sure that every eligible registered voter in Colorado gets a mail-in ballot, and we made it so that voters can register to vote online, and at any time — even on Election Day. Automatic voter registration, mail-in ballots, and fixing the Voting Rights Act — which has been gutted of its protections for communities of color by the Supreme Court — will work to make voter suppression a relic of the past and hold our leaders accountable. It is also essential that every resident gets counted by the U.S. Census. In 2010, 2.1% of Black Americans and 1.5% of Latinx Americans were not counted, which impacted how federal dollars were spent and congressional seats apportioned. In 2020, Colorado is at risk of losing $48–$193 million in federal spending if significant undercounting occurs. We can close this gap by providing more funding for the census to reach as many residents as possible. Policies that promote civic engagement help everyone participate in our democracy, and lead to political outcomes that address injustice by genuinely reflecting the will of the people.  Pledge Continued Engagement: Collaboration with, and leadership from, communities of color will be essential to achieving any of the policy objectives I have mentioned. Throughout my tenure as mayor of Denver and governor of Colorado, I relied heavily on advocates in communities of color to develop and implement our agenda to build a more welcoming and diverse state. We must not only fight for legislation that creates a fairer America, we should also lift up and celebrate the arts and traditions of communities of color that intertwine to form America’s cultural fabric. If elected to the U.S. Senate, I hope to continue this collaborative working relationship, maintaining open lines of communication to craft policies that will help make America a more equitable place to live.  Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on email Share on print Join Us Email Address Zip Code Phone Number By providing your cell phone number you consent to receive 10 or more recurring updates or donation asks each month from Hickenlooper for Colorado by automated text message. Txt HELP for help, STOP to end. Msg&Data rates may apply. Privacy Policy. Terms of Service. Home Privacy Policy Terms Accessibility Volunteer Donate PAID FOR BY HICKENLOOPER FOR COLORADO PO Box 18886, Denver, CO 80218 hello@hickenlooper.com Facebook-f Twitter Instagram Flickr Spotify Youtube
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Prevención de violencia con armas de fuego - John Hickenlooper for U.S. SenateSkip to main content Enable accessibility for visually impaired Open the accessibility menu Skip to content VOTANDO EN COLORADO VOTANDO EN COLORADO Indicio Conoce a John English Facebook-f Twitter Instagram Spotify Donar Donar Prevención de violencia con armas de fuego Estados Unidos se enfrenta a una epidemia de violencia con armas de fuego que es trágicamente demasiado familiar para nosotros en Colorado. Hemos perdido a muchos de nuestros amigos, vecinos e hijos a causa de las armas, lo que ha resultado en la pérdida [DATE REMOVED]9,000 vidas en todo el país en solo un año. Durante la última década, más [DATE REMOVED] millones de estadounidenses han recibido disparos y millones más están traumatizados por la violencia generada por las armas de fuego, que ha impactado desproporcionadamente a las comunidades de color. Cada día, 21 niños más son víctimas de la violencia con armas de fuego. La pérdida de vidas preciosas es incomprensible, devastadora y está profundamente grabada en nuestros corazones y recuerdos en lugares como Columbine, Arapahoe, Platte Canyon, STEM School de Highlands Ranch, Aurora y en escuelas y comunidades en todo nuestro estado y nación. Durante demasiado tiempo, el liderazgo de la Asociación Nacional del Rifle (NRA) ha luchado imprudentemente contra incluso las medidas más básicas de seguridad de armas, como las verificaciones de antecedentes universales, que el 90% de los estadounidenses y la mayoría de los miembros de la NRA apoyan. Cuando yo era gobernador de Colorado, afrontamos el liderazgo de la NRA y ganamos. No fue fácil, pero con el apoyo de funcionarios electos locales y estatales y una coalición diversa de residentes de Colorado, pudimos promulgar leyes que requieren la verificación de antecedentes para todas las ventas de armas, así como la prohibición de cargadores de gran capacidad. Nos convertimos en el primer estado púrpura en promulgar una legislación integral sobre seguridad de armas. Si pudiéramos vencer a la NRA en Colorado, podemos vencerlos a nivel nacional. El senador Gardner ha recibido casi 4 millones de dólares en apoyo de parte de la NRA y está obstaculizando que la verificación de antecedentes, entre otras reformas, reciba una audiencia en el Senado de los Estados Unidos. También votó en contra de cerrar las escapatorias que permiten que las armas caigan en manos peligrosas. Ya basta. Como su próximo senador, lucharé por políticas integrales y de sentido común para combatir la violencia con las armas de fuego. Una agenda nacional: políticas de seguridad de armas con sentido común Asegurar verificaciones de antecedentes para todas las ventas de armas. Las verificaciones de antecedentes salvan vidas. Desde la década de 1990, el sistema de verificación de antecedentes ha bloqueado la venta de más [DATE REMOVED] millones de armas a delincuentes, abusadores domésticos y otras personas peligrosas. Necesitamos ampliar las verificaciones de antecedentes para cubrir espectáculos de armas y minoristas en línea, así como cerrar el “Charleston Loophole” (La Escapatoria de Charleston) para garantizar que todas las verificaciones de antecedentes se completen correctamente. Establecer límites nacionales para cargadores. Los límites de los cargadores salvan vidas durante los tiroteos. El tirador que mató [DATE REMOVED] e hirió a 59 en un cine de Aurora en 2012 llevaba una pistola equipada con un cargador de 100 balas. El tirador en Tucson, Arizona, que mató [DATE REMOVED] personas e hirió [DATE REMOVED], incluida la ex congresista Gabby Giffords en 2011, llevaba una pistola equipada con un cargador [DATE REMOVED]3 balas. Ese tiroteo llegó a su fin cuando un espectador lo abordó mientras intentaba recargar su arma. Restaurar una prohibición de armas de asalto. Es hora de que el Congreso promulgue una prohibición efectiva de armas de asalto que se base en la legislación anterior que expiró en 2004. Financiar la intervención comunitaria contra la violencia. Las comunidades de color en Colorado y en nuestra nación tienen que lidiar a diario con la violencia con armas de fuego y enfrentan un riesgo considerablemente mayor de ser víctimas de homicidio con arma de fuego. Se ha demostrado que la financiación de programas de intervención contra violencia basados ​​en evidencia es eficaz para reducir los tiroteos en ciudades de todo el país. Fortalecer la aplicación de la ley contra el tráfico de armas. Debemos detener el tráfico de armas fortaleciendo el enjuiciamiento del pequeño número de traficantes de armas de “mal actor” que venden armas ilegalmente sin una verificación de antecedentes. La policía también necesita las herramientas para tratar las “compras fraudulentas” (donde los delincuentes que no pueden pasar una verificación de antecedentes hacen que alguien compre armas en su nombre) como delitos graves. Detener la proliferación de “pistolas fantasmas”. Las pistolas fantasmas son armas de fuego que se pueden ensamblar en casa con piezas que se han pedido en línea o producidas por una impresora 3D. Están disponibles sin una verificación de antecedentes, no pueden ser rastreados por la policía y son un problema emergente en Colorado y en todo el país. Debemos aprobar una ley federal que garantice que nadie pueda construir un arma de fuego sin primero pasar por una verificación de antecedentes. Responsabilizar a los fabricantes de armas imprudentes. Tenemos que derogar la ley [DATE REMOVED] que protege de manera única a los fabricantes de armas irresponsables para que puedan ser reportados y los coloque en la misma categoría que cualquier otro negocio. Implementar leyes de Orden de Protección contra Riesgo Extremo. Para evitar futuros actos de violencia, las leyes de Orden de Protección contra Riesgo Extremo permiten que las familias y las fuerzas del orden eliminen temporalmente el acceso de un individuo a las armas de fuego cuando se considere que constituye un peligro para sí mismo o para otros. Estas políticas son efectivas tanto para prevenir tiroteos masivos como para reducir el suicidio. Crear un futuro más seguro para nuestros niños y comunidades. Sé bien que el liderazgo del NRA se ha embarcado en un esfuerzo implacable para engañar, caracterizar y despistar. Sabemos en Colorado que podemos proteger nuestros derechos de la Segunda Enmienda y proteger a nuestros niños y comunidades con políticas razonables de seguridad de armas. Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on email Share on print Únete a Nosotros Email Código Postal Número de Teléfono Recomendación de canción Al proporcionar su número de teléfono celular, usted acepta recibir actualizaciones periódicas de la campaña de Hickenlooper para Colorado. Envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra HELP para obtener ayuda, STOP para dejar de recibir mensajes. Puede ser que tarifas de mensajes y data sean aplicadas. Política de Privacidad. Política de privacidad Condiciones Accesibilidad English PAGADO POR HICKENLOOPER FOR COLORADO PO Box 18886, Denver, CO 80218 hello@hickenlooper.com Facebook-f Twitter Instagram Flickr Spotify Youtube
hickenlooper.com3 months ago